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1040 Abroad: Is now the time to give up your US citizenship?

1040 Abroad: Is now the time to give up your US citizenship?

The stock market is dropping and many see their wealth decreasing. This can be an opportunity for those considering renouncing US citizenship as it can lower its cost.

By way of background, those who are covered expatriates when renouncing US citizenship are subject to an exit tax – a deemed disposition of all of your assets, with potentially taxes to pay on that phantom capital gain.

Latest impact on the wealth of potential renunciants

The stock market is dropping, with the broader market being down about 20% for the year and individual stocks of tech companies dropping by about 40%

While those are rather depressing numbers, they offer an opportunity to some to renounce while avoiding covered expatriate status.

With the stock market flirting with new lows, and the net wealth of shareholders would likewise meet depressing levels, it just might be the right time to renounce. You might have just crossed the $2 million dollar mark which would allow you to renounce without being a covered expatriate.

Not only might you mot be a covered expatriate. But even if you are a covered expatriate, these unrealized losses would reduce the amount of exit tax, if any.

US consulates still feel the lingering effect of the covid 19 pandemic. As such, in most cases, you would have a wait time of 6 months before being able to schedule an appointment.

Contact 1040 Abroad and we’ll be able to advise you if those apply to your individual circumstances as well as guide you to a consulate with a wait time to get an appointment of less than a month.

Who is a Covered Expatriate?

You are considered a covered expatriate and have to pay the related Exit Tax if you meet any of the following criteria:

– You have too many assets: a net worth of $2 million or more,

– You have too much income: an average net U.S. income tax liability of greater than $162,000 for the five-year period prior to expatriation,

– You fail to certify that you have complied with all of the U.S. federal tax obligations for the preceding five years.

The exit tax that you, as a covered expatriate, would have to pay is calculated as if you have sold all of your assets at Fair Market Value on the day prior to your relinquishment, and the associated capital gains are subject to this tax. The Internal Revenue Code provides that the first $699,000 of this capital gain will not be taxed. Expatriation is considered to be effective for tax purposes, even if you fail to file the Expatriation Information Statement (form 8854). The exceptions from the main rule are certain deferred compensation items, specified tax-deferred accounts, and non-grantor trusts.

Contact 1040 Abroad and we’ll be able to advise you if those apply to your individual circumstances as well as guide you to a consulate with a wait time to get an appointment of less than a month.

About 1040 Abroad Inc.

1040 Abroad is a tax firm founded in 2012, consisting of a unique international team that is led by a U.S. expat.

Always having our client’s best interest in mind, we work hard to make sure that U.S. expats become tax compliant and live the life abroad free of any hassle.

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